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  • February 20, 2019
    EOS
    Emma Berntman
    Antimicrobial resistance – or AMR, for short – is present in every country, and is an increasing threat. In this episode of Amplified Emma Berntman, Hermes EOS’s engagement lead on this subject, discusses AMR: the ability of micro-organisms – such as bacteria, viruses and fungi – to adapt to, and overcome medications that once destroyed them.
  • July 31, 2018
    Stewardship
    Emma Berntman
    A flood of recent media coverage has highlighted how society’s addiction to plastics is pushing the environment to the limit. But behind the demonisation of plastic itself lies the need for a paradigm shift in the way we produce and consume goods. In this podcast Emma Berntman, Hermes EOS, discusses the concept of a circular economy.
  • July 23, 2018
    Stewardship
    Christine Chow
    Society’s addiction to plastics is pushing the environment to the limit. Despite the recent media focus on plastic as an environmental issue, its popularity as a raw material continues to rise – experts estimate production will increase by a further 40% over the next decade. However, in a recent engagement insight, Full cycle: investing for a circular economy, Dr. Christine Chow, Director, and Emma Berntman, Engagement, Hermes EOS, explain that behind the demonisation of plastic itself lies the need for a paradigm shift in the way we produce and consume goods – one in which we can participate as investors as well as consumers. Plastic planet There are reasons for the ongoing ubiquity of plastic: it is cheap, lightweight and waterproof. Plastic has become emblematic of the problems inherent in the traditional consumption-led economic model. Its durability and visibility mean we are now literally seeing it everywhere: of the 8.3bn metric tonnes of plastic ever produced, an estimated 4.9bn tonnes have been discarded rather than incinerated or recycled. While it is possible to reduce the environmental impact of plastics, such as the Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) widely used in drinks bottles, through more effective and comprehensive recycling, the way plastic is used in other products makes recycling almost impossible. This is because they were never designed to be recycled: they remain part of an economic model in which products are produced, used and thrown away.
  • Emma Berntman
    A flood of recent media coverage has highlighted how society’s addiction to plastics is pushing the environment to the limit. But behind the demonisation of plastic itself lies the need for a paradigm shift in the way we produce and consume goods – one in which we can participate as investors as well as consumers. Despite the recent media focus on plastic as an environmental issue, its popularity as a raw material continues to rise. Half of the total amount of synthetic plastic resins and fibres ever manufactured have been produced in the past 13 years[footnote]1“Production, use, and fate of all plastics ever made,” by by Geyer, R; Janbeck, J R, Law, K L. Published in Science Advances, July 2017.1“Production, use, and fate of all plastics ever made,” by by Geyer, R; Janbeck, J R, Law, K L. Published in Science Advances, July 2017.[/footnote], and experts estimate that production will increase by a further 40% over the next decade; according to the American Chemistry Council, $186bn has been invested in new plastics manufacturing facilities in the US alone since 2010[footnote]“180bn-investment-in-plastic-factories-feeds-global-packaging-binge,” by Matthew Taylor. Published in The Guardian on 26 December 2017