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Authors

  • 01/11/2017
    Equities
    Louise Dudley
    Our core investment strategy is built on a solid and proven process. It aims to generate consistent, positive relative returns by investing in companies with strong fundamentals – including robust financial results, competitive strength, leading management teams who appreciate the potency of ESG risks, improving market sentiment and of course, an attractive valuation. These fundamental characteristics constitute a strong investment. But the tools and data used to identify companies which embody these attributes are subject to continual change and improvement. This evolution is illustrated well through our focus on ESG considerations.
  • 12/06/2017
    Equities
    Louise Dudley
    In this video Louise Dudley, Porfolio Manager in the Hermes Global Equities team, explains how risk management is addressed from a macro perspective in the investment process.
  • 20/03/2017
    Equities
    Louise Dudley
    While the utility sector is not renowned for its ESG credentials, some companies are pioneering the new technologies that will drive the sector in the years to come, cleaning up energy production in the process. One such example is Dong Energy, a leading provider of wind power and a shining reflection of the benefits of responsible energy production. Concern Dong Energy was founded in 2006 when six Danish power companies merged. The company has described its business at the time of the merger as one of the most coal-intensive utilities in Europe. It also owned a large number of oil and gas resources. This exposure to fossil fuels posed significant investment risks. First, the accelerating pace of global warming, and the broadening understanding of it, meant that governments were becoming increasingly likely to limit fossil fuel burning on an absolute basis. This scenario would leave traditional energy producers with ‘stranded assets’: unusable resources which are prematurely written down, resulting in a significant financial loss. This operational risk has become particularly acute following COP21, the United Nations’ climate conference in 2015, where representatives of 195 countries committed to limiting global warming to two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.