Search this website. You can use fund codes to locate specific funds

Real Estate: flexibility and adaptability in challenging times

The impact of the coronavirus pandemic is being felt across global real estate markets: it has changed the way people live and work. But what does it mean for the future of real estate? And will it thrust challenges already facing the industry into the spotlight?

In March, governments around the world introduced strict lockdown measures to prevent the spread of the coronavirus pandemic, forcing property managers into crisis management mode. Shuttered shops and restaurants, empty offices and idle construction sites were just some of the signs of the impact of the virus on the real-estate market. Since then, lockdown restrictions have eased, but many continue to work from home as the world continues its fight against Covid-19.

For the real-estate market, the virus also put the challenges that were already facing the industry under the spotlight, such as, creating a stock of affordable housing and improving housing conditions. But amid the crisis, can we build a better future?

In this episode of Amplified, Kirsty Wilman, Strategic Projects Director in Private Markets, and Ben Sanderson, Executive Director – Fund Manager, reflect on conversations with their colleagues at Federated Hermes as well as external guests over the summer months.

For Wilman, there was already an underlying trend towards flexible working and working from home. “It will be fascinating to see what this means for the future of how we work flexibly and the future of the office. Are we going to be working from home more in the future? Or are we going to be working in local hubs?” she asks. Wilman also highlights the importance of “adaptability and flexibility” in using the spaces we already have to meet our changing needs as consumers, workers and residents.

Meanwhile, Sanderson highlights how lifestyles have changed since the onset of the pandemic. “People had to turn their homes into offices and so, their homes became more important. In many ways, the discrepancies and disparities between the quality of housing became real during this period. People with poorer quality homes struggled compared to those with large, high-quality housing in terms of home-schooling and working from home,” he explained.

This podcast features contributions from Ed Sellick, Director of Asset Management, Will Gibby, Global Residential Fund Manager, and Emily Bird, Fund Manager, as well as external guests, David Dix, Principal and Portfolio Manager at the Townsend Group, and Richard Stonehouse, Principal and Head of Residential Investment at Avison Young.

What lies ahead for the real-estate market? To find out, tune in to Amplified.

More Insights

The soil carbon sponge: A sequestration trump card
In a briefing to investors, Walter Jehne, co-founder of NGO Regenerate Earth, argued that a focus on cutting emissions misses the point when it comes to understanding what a healthy biosphere could do to sequester carbon.
ESG Materiality Q2 2022
The invasion has accelerated the sustainable energy transition, pushing up demand for ‘green’ metals and components required to facilitate electrification, says Olivia Lankester, director of responsible investing & sustainability, global emerging markets, in the latest ESG Materiality newsletter.
The coming real estate renovation wave – and what it means for investors
In our first View from Private Markets newsletter we set out Federated Hermes’ approach to financing the carbon transition in commercial property.
Market snapshot: Equities tumble as inflation reality bites
Full impact from the rise in commodity prices due to the conflict in Ukraine has yet to be felt in consumer prices
Market snapshot: Recession fears grow as central banks step up inflation fight
As the Federal Reserve and the Bank of England raise rates back to back, the risks of a global slowdown are increasing.
Take note: Finding opportunity in mispriced corporate hybrids
In our latest white paper, Robin Usson, senior credit analyst, asks: Is there scope to extract structural alpha from misunderstood extension risk?