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Authors

  • 28/08/2020
    Equities
    Louise Dudley
    Combining attractive fundamentals and good or improving ESG characteristics
  • Louise Dudley
    Our Global Equities team explain the benefit of being a global investor in turbulent times.
  • 29/11/2019
    Equities
    Lewis Grant
    We explain why we adopt an integrated investment approach and how it shapes our research agenda.
  • 21/05/2019
    Equities
    Lewis Grant
    Today, we look back on six years of Global Equity ESG.
  • 05/11/2018
    Equities
    Lewis Grant
    Our seminal paper, ESG investing: does it just make you feel good, or is it actually good for your portfolio?, published in 2014, demonstrated the performance benefits of integrating environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors into investment decisions. 
  • 16/07/2018
    Equities
    Lewis Grant
    A mix of geopolitical stresses, political instability, monetary policy tightening and, more recently, global trade tensions, have dominated international news flow – and impacted equity markets – in the last 12 months. Amid such volatility, our all-weather approach enabled us to focus on time-tested company fundamentals. Our proprietary Alpha Model assesses a company’s long-term prospects, by identifying those with the most attractive combination of fundamental characteristics or “factors”. It is then used to create a portfolio that aims to generate consistent, positive relative returns regardless of market direction or the wider geopolitical environment. In this issue of Equitorial, we explain how our model-driven fundamental analysis has generated consistent alpha during a 12-month period of heightened volatility. Defining factor investing For Hermes Global Equities, consistency is key. We believe that the best way to generate superior consistent returns is to apply a systematic approach, which minimises behavioural biases, with disciplined subjective analysis. To do so, we cannot simply categorise ourselves as value, growth, or indeed, quality investors. Such style portfolios can deliver excess returns to the patient investor over the long term, but by definition no form of style investing works consistently. For this reason, we classify our investing style as ‘core’.
  • Lewis Grant
    The exclusion of certain businesses from investment portfolios – such as tobacco or weapons stocks – whose activities oppose the ethical views held by an investor, was initially practiced by a fervent few as one of the earliest forms of responsible investing.